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Effective Local, State and National Campaigning...a Guide for Voters and Candidates

Updated: Nov 20



Thirty-six months ago, I began watching how Republicans campaign for local, state and national public office.


This article highlights the Real People USA strategy to connect voters and political candidates.


There are several important points candidates and voters need to consider to win in future elections after seeing the outcomes of the 2022 Midterm Election. These points are as follows:



  1. The previous labels identifying Democrats and Republicans no longer exist.

  2. Candidates and voters need to decide if they support life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness or socialism/communism.

  3. Future elections must focus more on what we have in common and less on what separates us. Real People USA likes the Maslow Hierarchy of Needs approach to help Americans come together.

  4. Only natural born Americans and naturalized citizen should run as public servants or political office.

  5. Future elections will require candidates to work harder for early voter commitments and not just ask for campaign donations.

  6. Voters and candidates should work along side one another to improve better Election Day results.

  7. Candidates need to start campaigning much earlier than a few months before primary elections.

  8. Candidates must be knowledgeable of their states' election laws and the U.S. Constitution.

  9. Candidates should seek reputable election attorneys at the beginning of their campaigns.

  10. Voters are recommended to join candidates' email campaigns.

  11. Candidates must communicate regularly and often with voters and donors.

  12. Candidate and voter training should include topics which define capitalism, socialism fascism, tyranny and communism.

  13. Candidate and voter training should include a basic knowledge about the Russian Bolshevik Revolution and Saul Alinsky's Rules for Radicals.

  14. Social media should be considered the last method for candidates to communicate with the voting public.


Rick Nappier

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